InjuryFree, Inc.

America's Leading Innovators of Workplace Injury Prevention Solutions

News & Events

Occupational Safety News Bulletin – 7/18

OSHA LogoOccupational Safety news headline for late July, 2011:

  • National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health makes recommendations to OSHA

    The National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) has recommended that OSHA keep the Injury and Illness Prevention Program proposed rule as the highest priority in its regulatory agenda. They also request that the program ruling is kept on a timely schedule as it moves through the regulatory process. NACOSH also expressed support the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in order to modernize the system for collection of injury and illness data to assure that it is timely, complete, accurate and both accessible and useful to employers, employees, responsible government agencies and members of the public. Read more about NACOSH’s recommendations.

  • OSHA schedules meetings to discuss occupational exposure to infectious diseases

    OSHA announces that it will hold two informal stakeholder meetings in July to request comments on occupational exposure to infections disease. OSHA plans to use gathered information to investigate how to best protect workers from exposure in the healthcare setting. Read more on OSHA’s stakeholder meetings.

  • DOL travels to Florida to bring awareness to heat-related illness

    Secretary of the Department of Labor, Linda Solis, traveled to Florida July 13 to take OSHA’s message of Water-Rest-Shade to workers. She was able to meet with workers at a Florida utilities company, Florida Power and Light. There she stated that “”We’re obviously concerned about utility workers, berry pickers, landscapers and brick layers. But our message is just as important for the baggage handlers who transport luggage across the hot tarmac at Miami International Airport or car salesmen who pace the hot asphalt lots at dealerships that line Northwest 36th Street and 27th Avenue, as well as those working on road crews in heavy safety gear revamping North Miami Avenue and I-195,” Solis explained. “Statistically, we know that Latino workers are at the greatest risk of heat illness. They are more likely to work in outdoor industries such as agriculture and construction and are at greater risk of ending up hospitalized or worse from heat stroke.” Read more about heat-related illness.

  • OSHA issues hazard alert on use of scissor lifts to film events

    OSHA issued a hazard alert regarding the hazards found with using a scissor lift to film events and functions, such as athletics and band activities. Hazards listed include: using during high winds or bad weather, overloading the equipment, removing guardrails, or use on uneven or unstable ground.
    This alert comes after the death of a 20-year-old University of Notre Dame employee during a football practice in October when he was filming the team from a scissor lift that was blown over by high winds. The worker, who reportedly was not trained to properly operate the equipment, raised the lift more than 39 feet into the air on a day in which winds exceeded 50 miles per hour. Read more about scissor lift alerts.

  • OSHA’s David Michaels participates in European Union talks on worker safety

    OSHA Assistant Secretary David Michaels traveled to Brussels, Belgium, to speak at a July 13 meeting of the European Parliament Committee on Employment and Social Affairs. He spoke about the current state of occupational safety and health in the US and opportunities for global progress by working together, stating “our successful collaboration can serve as a blueprint to develop the tools employers and workers need to successfully implement these programs. We benefit from each others’ perspectives, and we move forward to improve conditions for our workers, our economies and our societies.” Read more on Michaels’ talks with the European Union.

Tags: , , , , , , ,


No Comments

Complete the form below to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment